President Donald Trump announced on Sunday restrictions to the United States for some Venezuelan citizens linked to the regime of Nicholas Maduro. Olivier Douliery TNS

The Venezuelan community of South Florida was divided Monday on the decision of the administration of Donald Trump to restrict  entry to the United States to certain citizens of the oil country linked to the regime of Nicholas Maduro.

Some said it is a useful measure, to punish the dictatorship, yet others fear that it will unfairly harm or impact on them.

The ban – announced Sunday night for Venezuela, Chad and North Korea – is aimed at officials of a number of Venezuelan government entities and their families. However, a few details announced so far raise concerns about the effect that this could have on the migratory processes of many who were forced to leave the country to escape the regime of Caracas.

In addition to the three countries added on Sunday, the list of travel restrictions already included citizens of Iran, Libya, Yemen and Somalia, while Sudan’s were suspended on Sunday.

“If my passport is now in the same lot as the Iranian, North Korean and several Orthodox Islamic countries, it is no wonder,” said José Hernández, one of the Venezuelan opposition’s representatives in South Florida.

Unlike the total prohibitions imposed on citizens of North Korea and Chad, Venezuelans are limited at this time to officials of a specific number of government entities, and their immediate family members with nonimmigrant work visas (B-1) , tourism (B-2) and both (B1 / B2).

Among the agencies involved are the Ministries of Interior and Justice which includes Foreign Affairs, as well as the Administrative Service of Identification, Migration and Aliens, the Scientific and Criminal Investigations Corps and the Bolivarian Service of National Intelligence.

The measures make no mention of changes for Venezuelans who have obtained the status of temporary residence or permanent residence, but instruct the immigration authorities “to take additional measures to ensure the validity of the information provided by Venezuelan citizens” that they already have US visas.

Some leaders of the Venezuelan community in Miami say that these new changes will contribute significantly in the process of further isolating Maduro internationally.

Image result for Nicolas Maduro

President Nicolas Maduro

The Venezuelan community of South Florida was divided Monday on the decision of the administration of Donald Trump to restrict the entrance to the United States to certain citizens of the oil country linked to the regime of Nicholas Maduro.

Some said it is a useful measure, to punish the dictatorship, yet others fear that it will unfairly harm or impact on them.

The ban – announced Sunday night for Venezuela, Chad and North Korea – is aimed at officials of a number of Venezuelan government entities and their families. However, a few details announced so far raise concerns about the effect that this could have on the migratory processes of many who were forced to leave the country to escape the regime of Caracas.

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In addition to the three countries added on Sunday, the list of travel restrictions already included citizens of Iran, Libya, Yemen and Somalia, while Sudan’s were suspended on Sunday.

“If my passport is now in the same lot as the Iranian, North Korean and several Orthodox Islamic countries, it is no wonder,” said José Hernández, one of the Venezuelan opposition’s representatives in South Florida.

Unlike the total prohibitions imposed on citizens of North Korea and Chad, Venezuelans are limited at this time to officials of a specific number of government entities, and their immediate family members with nonimmigrant work visas (B-1) , tourism (B-2) and both (B1 / B2).

Among the agencies involved are the Ministries of Interior and Justice which includes Foreign Affairs, as well as the Administrative Service of Identification, Migration and Aliens, the Scientific and Criminal Investigations Corps and the Bolivarian Service of National Intelligence.

The measures make no mention of changes for Venezuelans who have obtained the status of temporary residence or permanent residence, but instruct the immigration authorities “to take additional measures to ensure the validity of the information provided by Venezuelan citizens” that they already have US visas.

Some leaders of the Venezuelan community in Miami say that these new changes will contribute significantly in the process of further isolating Maduro internationally.

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