Panama_Paper_leak

SOURCE: CNBC

 

CNBC’s Eamon Javers speaks with Swiss bank whistleblower Brad Birkenfeld about the Panama Papers leaks.

 

Bradley Birkenfeld is the most significant financial whistleblower of all time, so you might think he’d be cheering on the disclosures in the new Panama Papers leaks. But today, Birkenfeld is raising questions about the source of the information that is shaking political regimes around the world.

 

Birkenfeld, an American citizen, was a banker working at UBS in Switzerland when he approached the U.S. government with information on massive amounts of tax evasion by Americans with secret accounts in Switzerland. By the end of his whistleblowing career, Birkenfeld had served more than two years in a U.S. federal prison, been awarded $104 million by the IRS for his information, and shattered the foundations of more than a century of Swiss banking secrecy.

 

Bradley Birkenfeld, a former UBS AG banker, speaks during an interview at Schuylkill County Federal Correctional Institution in Minersville, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday, April 27, 2009.

 

In an exclusive interview Tuesday from Munich, Germany, Birkenfeld said he doesn’t think the source of the 11 million documents stolen from a Panamanian law firm should automatically be considered a whistleblower like himself. Instead, he said, the hacking of the Panama City-based firm, called Mossack Fonseca, could have been done by a U.S. intelligence agency.

 

“The CIA I’m sure is behind this, in my opinion,” Birkenfeld said.

 

Birkenfeld pointed to the fact that the political uproar created by the disclosures have mainly impacted countries with tense relationships with the United States. “The very fact that we see all these names surface that are the direct quote-unquote enemies of the United States, Russia, China, Pakistan, Argentina and…

 

READ MORE…

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here